Publication
Title
Social preferences, support for redistribution, and attitudes towards vulnerable groups
Author
Abstract
In this work, I explore the explanatory power of experimentally-elicited social preferences over self-reported support for redistribution. Social preferences are obtained by means of a simplified dictator game embedded in an online survey that also includes a questionnaire on preferences for redistribution, beliefs, inequality perceptions, and ideological positioning. I find that social preferences covary strongly with self-reported support for increased taxation. Besides, more generous social preference types are more likely to have favourable views towards specific welfare beneficiaries, especially those usually regarded as less deserving, such as migrants, the unemployed, or the poor. Some elements that correlate negatively with preferences for redistribution are being older than 65, having a right-wing ideology, believing that personal effort is the main driver of one's economic position, and distrusting others; while being a parent or perceiving high inequality have the opposite effect. Social preferences help thus further understand public support for redistribution and the political feasibility of redistributive policies.
Language
English
Source (journal)
Journal of behavioral and experimental economics. - 2014, currens
Publication
2023
ISSN
2214-8043
DOI
10.1016/J.SOCEC.2023.102112
Volume/pages
107 (2023) , p. 1-16
Article Reference
102112
ISI
001102133900001
Full text (Publisher's DOI)
Full text (open access)
UAntwerpen
Faculty/Department
Research group
Project info
Can we trust preferences estimated from happiness data? Disentangling the Gordian knot of happiness, preferences and scaling factors.
Publication type
Subject
Affiliation
Publications with a UAntwerp address
External links
Web of Science
Record
Identifier
Creation 09.01.2024
Last edited 11.01.2024
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