Publication
Title
Osteotomies around the knee alter alignment of the ankle and hindfoot : a systematic review of biomechanical and clinical studies
Author
Abstract
center dot Purpose: Emerging reports suggest an important involvement of the ankle/hindfoot alignment in the outcome of knee osteotomy; however, a comprehensive overview is currently not available. Therefore, we systematically reviewed all studies investigating biomechanical and clinical outcomes related to the ankle/hindfoot following knee osteotomies.center dot Methods: A systematic literature search was conducted on PubMed, Web of Science, EMBASE and Cochrane Library according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines and registered on international prospective register of systematic reviews (PROSPERO) (CRD42021277189). Combining knee osteotomy and ankle/hindfoot alignment, all biomechanical and clinical studies were included. Studies investigating knee osteotomy in conjunction with total knee arthroplasty and case reports were excluded. The QUality Appraisal for Cadaveric Studies (QUACS) scale and Methodological Index for Non-Randomized Studies (MINORS) scores were used for quality assessment.center dot Results: Out of 3554 hits, 18 studies were confirmed eligible, including 770 subjects. The minority of studies (n = 3) assessed both high tibial-and distal femoral osteotomy. Following knee osteotomy, the mean tibiotalar contact pressure decreased (n = 4) except in the presence of a rigid subtalar joint (n = 1) or a talar tilt deformity (n =1). Patient symptoms and/or radiographic alignment at the level of the ankle/hindfoot improved after knee osteotomy (n = 13). However, factors interfering with an optimal outcome were a small preoperative lateral distal tibia angle, a small hip-knee-ankle axis (HKA) angle, a large HKA correction (>14.5 degrees) and a preexistent hindfoot deformity (>15.9 degrees).center dot Conclusions: Osteotomies to correct knee deformity alter biomechanical and clinical outcomes at the level of the ankle/hindfoot. In general, these changes were beneficial, but several parameters were identified in association with deterioration of ankle/hindfoot symptoms following knee osteotomy.
Purpose: Emerging reports suggest an important involvement of the ankle/hindfoot alignment in the outcome of knee osteotomy; however, a comprehensive overview is currently not available. Therefore, we systematically reviewed all studies investigating biomechanical and clinical outcomes related to the ankle/hindfoot following knee osteotomies. Methods: A systematic literature search was conducted on PubMed, Web of Science, EMBASE and Cochrane Library according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines and registered on international prospective register of systematic reviews (PROSPERO) (CRD42021277189). Combining knee osteotomy and ankle/hindfoot alignment, all biomechanical and clinical studies were included. Studies investigating knee osteotomy in conjunction with total knee arthroplasty and case reports were excluded. The QUality Appraisal for Cadaveric Studies (QUACS) scale and Methodological Index for Non-Randomized Studies (MINORS) scores were used for quality assessment. Results: Out of 3554 hits, 18 studies were confirmed eligible, including 770 subjects. The minority of studies (n = 3) assessed both high tibial-and distal femoral osteotomy. Following knee osteotomy, the mean tibiotalar contact pressure decreased (n = 4) except in the presence of a rigid subtalar joint (n = 1) or a talar tilt deformity (n =1). Patient symptoms and/or radiographic alignment at the level of the ankle/hindfoot improved after knee osteotomy (n = 13). However, factors interfering with an optimal outcome were a small preoperative lateral distal tibia angle, a small hip-knee-ankle axis (HKA) angle, a large HKA correction (>14.5 degrees) and a preexistent hindfoot deformity (>15.9 degrees). Conclusions: Osteotomies to correct knee deformity alter biomechanical and clinical outcomes at the level of the ankle/hindfoot. In general, these changes were beneficial, but several parameters were identified in association with deterioration of ankle/hindfoot symptoms following knee osteotomy.
Purpose: Emerging reports suggest an important involvement of the ankle/hindfoot alignment in the outcome of knee osteotomy; however, a comprehensive overview is currently not available. Therefore, we systematically reviewed all studies investigating biomechanical and clinical outcomes related to the ankle/hindfoot following knee osteotomies.Methods: A systematic literature search was conducted on PubMed, Web of Science, EMBASE and Cochrane Library according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines and registered on international prospective register of systematic reviews (PROSPERO) (CRD42021277189). Combining knee osteotomy and ankle/hindfoot alignment, all biomechanical and clinical studies were included. Studies investigating knee osteotomy in conjunction with total knee arthroplasty and case reports were excluded. The QUality Appraisal for Cadaveric Studies (QUACS) scale and Methodological Index for Non-Randomized Studies (MINORS) scores were used for quality assessment.Results: Out of 3554 hits, 18 studies were confirmed eligible, including 770 subjects. The minority of studies (n = 3) assessed both high tibial- and distal femoral osteotomy. Following knee osteotomy, the mean tibiotalar contact pressure decreased (n = 4) except in the presence of a rigid subtalar joint (n = 1) or a talar tilt deformity (n = 1). Patient symptoms and/or radiographic alignment at the level of the ankle/hindfoot improved after knee osteotomy (n = 13). However, factors interfering with an optimal outcome were a small preoperative lateral distal tibia angle, a small hip-knee-ankle axis (HKA) angle, a large HKA correction (>14.5 degrees) and a preexistent hindfoot deformity (>15.9 degrees).Conclusions: Osteotomies to correct knee deformity alter biomechanical and clinical outcomes at the level of the ankle/hindfoot. In general, these changes were beneficial, but several parameters were identified in association with deterioration of ankle/hindfoot symptoms following knee osteotomy.
Language
English
Source (journal)
EFORT Open Reviews. - [S.l.]
Publication
Bristol : Bioscientifica ltd , 2023
ISSN
2058-5241
DOI
10.1530/EOR-23-0104
Volume/pages
8 :11 (2023) , p. 818-829
ISI
001099867600004
001158414600001
001147348600001
Pubmed ID
37909698
Full text (Publisher's DOI)
Full text (open access)
UAntwerpen
Faculty/Department
Research group
Project info
Impact of Osteotomy Surgery on Lower-limb Contact Mechanics.
Publication type
Subject
Affiliation
Publications with a UAntwerp address
External links
Web of Science
Record
Identifier
Creation 09.01.2024
Last edited 04.03.2024
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