Publication
Title
Bed partner perception of CPAP therapy on relationship satisfaction and intimacy : a European perspective from the ESADA network
Author
Abstract
Obstructive sleep apnea increases morbidity and mortality risks. The most common treatment is continuous positive airway pressure, with nasal mask usage being important, but not always optimal. While most research on treatment adherence focuses on the patient, the bed partner's involvement may be detrimental. Our study aim is to obtain a European-wide picture of the bed partner's attitude and support towards continuous positive airway pressure therapy, including effects on relationship satisfaction and intimacy. The English translation of a German bed partner questionnaire, assessing relationship satisfaction and three major components (general attitude, perceived mask looks, intimacy effects) was distributed within the European Sleep Apnea Database Network and translated in participating countries' local language. Data were collected for 2 years. In total, 10 European countries (13 sleep centres) participated with 1546 questionnaires. Overall, 91% of bed partners had a positive attitude towards continuous positive airway pressure therapy, 86% perceived mask looks not negative, 64% stated no negative intimacy effects. More specifically, 71% mentioned improved sleep quality, 68% supported nightly device usage. For 41% of bed partners, relationship satisfaction increased (no change for 47%). These results were significantly more pronounced in Eastern/Southern Europe compared with Middle Europe, especially regarding intimacy effects. However, increased continuous positive airway pressure therapy length affected attitude negatively. These results provide necessary information to improve treatment strategies by including educational couple-focused approaches. Among others, we revealed that negative intimacy effects are not considered a barrier to continuous positive airway pressure adherence. These results may inspire more research identifying regional gaps with need for treatment adjustments.
Language
English
Source (journal)
Journal of sleep research. - Oxford
Publication
Hoboken : Wiley , 2023
ISSN
0962-1105
DOI
10.1111/JSR.14125
Volume/pages
(2023) , p. 1-13
Article Reference
e14125
ISI
001123652000001
Pubmed ID
38084019
Full text (Publisher's DOI)
Full text (open access)
UAntwerpen
Faculty/Department
Research group
Publication type
Subject
Affiliation
Publications with a UAntwerp address
External links
Web of Science
Record
Identifier
Creation 09.01.2024
Last edited 13.01.2024
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