Publication
Title
Basal metabolic rate using indirect calorimetry among individuals living with overweight or obesity : the accuracy of predictive equations for basal metabolic rate
Author
Abstract
Background & aims: Weight reduction programs in people with overweight or obesity can be informed by indirect calorimetry (IC) which is the gold standard to measure basal metabolic rate (BMR). Since IC is labor intensive and expensive, predictive equations are often used as an alternative. In this study the accuracy rate was assessed and bias statistics of predictive equations were compared to IC among subjects with overweight or obesity. Secondly, differences in clinical features between individuals with over-, accurate or underestimation of their BMR were evaluated. Methods: This cross sectional study included 731 subjects from the outpatient obesity clinic of the Antwerp University Hospital, Belgium. Fourteen equations were evaluated. Overestimation and underestimation was defined as >10 % and <10 % of measured BMR. Results: In the total population, mean age was 43 +/- 13 years, mean BMI 35.6 +/- 5.8 kg/m(2) and 79.5 % were female. The highest accuracy rates were reached by the Henry (73 %), Ravussin (73 %) and Mifflin St. Jeor (73 %) equations. In the total population, the Mifflin St. Jeor and Henry equation were unbiased. The Akern, Livingston and Ravussin equations were biased to underestimation. All other equations were biased to overestimation. Subjects with an underestimation of BMR had significantly higher waist-hip ratio (1.02 +/- 0.13 vs 0.91 +/- 0.11; P < 0.001), higher visceral adipose tissue (239 +/- 96 vs 162 +/- 93; P < 0.001), lower fat free mass (kg) (67.6 (45.4-95.9) vs 54.0 (39.6-95.5); P < 0.001) and a higher prevalence of the Metabolic Syndrome (24 (77.4) vs 112 (37.5); P < 0.001). Individuals with an overestimation of BMR had significantly higher subcutaneous adipose tissue (545 +/- 149 vs 612 +/- 149; P < 0.05), lower fasting plasma insulin (81 (10-2019) vs 67 (27-253); P < 0.001) and lower 2-h plasma glucose (132 (30-430) vs 116 (43-193); P < 0.001) during OGTT. Conclusions: In this study, the Henry and Mifflin St. Jeor equations have the highest accuracy and lowest bias to estimate the basal metabolic rate in a Caucasian, predominantly female, population living with overweight or obesity. Visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue and presence of metabolic syndrome were significantly different in individuals with over- or underestimation of BMR.
Language
English
Source (journal)
Clinical nutrition ESPEN. - [Oxford], 2015, currens
Publication
Amsterdam : Elsevier , 2024
ISSN
2405-4577
DOI
10.1016/J.CLNESP.2023.12.024
Volume/pages
59 (2024) , p. 422-435
ISI
001162028100001
Pubmed ID
38220405
Full text (Publisher's DOI)
Full text (publisher's version - intranet only)
UAntwerpen
Faculty/Department
Research group
Publication type
Subject
Affiliation
Publications with a UAntwerp address
External links
Web of Science
Record
Identifier
Creation 04.03.2024
Last edited 15.03.2024
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