Publication
Title
Subclinical epileptiform activity in the Alzheimer continuum : association with disease, cognition and detection method
Author
Abstract
BackgroundEpileptic seizures are an established comorbidity of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Subclinical epileptiform activity (SEA) as detected by 24-h electroencephalography (EEG) or magneto-encephalography (MEG) has been reported in temporal regions of clinically diagnosed AD patients. Although epileptic activity in AD probably arises in the mesial temporal lobe, electrical activity within this region might not propagate to EEG scalp electrodes and could remain undetected by standard EEG. However, SEA might lead to faster cognitive decline in AD.Aims1. To estimate the prevalence of SEA and interictal epileptic discharges (IEDs) in a well-defined cohort of participants belonging to the AD continuum, including preclinical AD subjects, as compared with cognitively healthy controls.2. To evaluate whether long-term-EEG (LTM-EEG), high-density-EEG (hd-EEG) or MEG is superior to detect SEA in AD.3. To characterise AD patients with SEA based on clinical, neuropsychological and neuroimaging parameters.Aims1. To estimate the prevalence of SEA and interictal epileptic discharges (IEDs) in a well-defined cohort of participants belonging to the AD continuum, including preclinical AD subjects, as compared with cognitively healthy controls.2. To evaluate whether long-term-EEG (LTM-EEG), high-density-EEG (hd-EEG) or MEG is superior to detect SEA in AD.3. To characterise AD patients with SEA based on clinical, neuropsychological and neuroimaging parameters.Aims1. To estimate the prevalence of SEA and interictal epileptic discharges (IEDs) in a well-defined cohort of participants belonging to the AD continuum, including preclinical AD subjects, as compared with cognitively healthy controls.2. To evaluate whether long-term-EEG (LTM-EEG), high-density-EEG (hd-EEG) or MEG is superior to detect SEA in AD.3. To characterise AD patients with SEA based on clinical, neuropsychological and neuroimaging parameters.MethodsSubjects (n = 49) belonging to the AD continuum were diagnosed according to the 2011 NIA-AA research criteria, with a high likelihood of underlying AD pathophysiology. Healthy volunteers (n = 24) scored normal on neuropsychological testing and were amyloid negative. None of the participants experienced a seizure before. Subjects underwent LTM-EEG and/or 50-min MEG and/or 50-min hd-EEG to detect IEDs.ResultsWe found an increased prevalence of SEA in AD subjects (31%) as compared to controls (8%) (p = 0.041; Fisher's exact test), with increasing prevalence over the disease course (50% in dementia, 27% in MCI and 25% in preclinical AD). Although MEG (25%) did not withhold a higher prevalence of SEA in AD as compared to LTM-EEG (19%) and hd-EEG (19%), MEG was significantly superior to detect spikes per 50 min (p = 0.002; Kruskall-Wallis test). AD patients with SEA scored worse on the RBANS visuospatial and attention subset (p = 0.009 and p = 0.05, respectively; Mann-Whitney U test) and had higher left frontal, (left) temporal and (left and right) entorhinal cortex volumes than those without.ConclusionWe confirmed that SEA is increased in the AD continuum as compared to controls, with increasing prevalence with AD disease stage. In AD patients, SEA is associated with more severe visuospatial and attention deficits and with increased left frontal, (left) temporal and entorhinal cortex volumes.Trial registrationClinicaltrials.gov, NCT04131491. 12/02/2020.
Language
English
Source (journal)
Alzheimer's research & therapy
Publication
2024
ISSN
1758-9193
DOI
10.1186/S13195-023-01373-9
Volume/pages
16 :1 (2024) , p. 1-20
Article Reference
19
ISI
001147603700001
Pubmed ID
38263073
Full text (Publisher's DOI)
Full text (open access)
UAntwerpen
Faculty/Department
Research group
Publication type
Subject
Affiliation
Publications with a UAntwerp address
External links
Web of Science
Record
Identifier
Creation 04.03.2024
Last edited 07.03.2024
To cite this reference