Publication
Title
The importance of mechanical and biological cues of tympanic membrane grafts to ensure optimal regeneration
Author
Abstract
Chronic suppurative otitis media (CSOM) is often associated with permanent tympanic membrane (TM) perforation and conductive hearing loss. The current clinical gold standard, using autografts and allografts, suffers from several drawbacks. Artificial replacement materials can help to overcome these drawbacks. Therefore, scaffolds fabricated through digital light processing (DLP) were herein created to support TM regeneration. Various UV-curable printing inks, including gelatin methacryloyl (GelMA), gelatin-norbornene-norbornene (GelNBNB) (crosslinked with thiolated gelatin (GelSH)) and alkene-functionalized poly-ε-caprolactone (E-PCL) (crosslinked with pentaerythritol tetrakis(3-mercaptopropionate) (PETA4SH)) were optimized regarding photo-initiator (PI) and photo-absorber (PA) concentrations through viscosity characterization, photo-rheology and the establishment of working curves for DLP. Our material platform enabled the development of constructs with a range of mechanical properties (plateau storage modulus varying between 15 and 119 kPa). Excellent network connectivity for the GelNBNB and E-PCL constructs was demonstrated (gel fractions >95 %) whereas a post-crosslinking step was required for the GelMA constructs. All samples showed excellent biocompatibility (viability >93 % and metabolic activity >88 %). Finally, in vivo and ex vivo assessments, including histology, vibration and deformation responses measured through laser doppler vibrometry and digital image correlation respectively, were performed to investigate the effects of the scaffolds on the anatomical and physiological regeneration of acute TM perforations in rabbits. The data showed that the most efficient healing with the best functional quality was obtained when both mechanical (obtained with the PCL-based resin) and biological (obtained with the gelatin-based resins) material properties were taken into account.
Language
English
Source (journal)
Biomaterials advances
Publication
2024
DOI
10.1016/J.BIOADV.2024.213827
Volume/pages
(2024) , 26 p.
Article Reference
213827
Full text (Publisher's DOI)
Full text (open access)
The author-created version that incorporates referee comments and is the accepted for publication version Available from 11.09.2024
UAntwerpen
Faculty/Department
Research group
Project info
Improving eardrum surgery by understanding sound power flow in the eardrum through new computer modeling methods.
The humanized dfna9 mouse model as a novel approach to identify tissue-specific and blood-based bio-assays that reflect human dfna9 pathophysiology and to test crispr/cas systems to prevent hearing loss.
Publication type
Subject
Affiliation
Publications with a UAntwerp address
External links
Record
Identifier
Creation 12.03.2024
Last edited 13.03.2024
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