Publication
Title
Nonlinear effects of the built environment on metro-integrated ridesourcing usage
Author
Abstract
Although ridesourcing has served as an emerging feeder mode to the metro system to solve the first/last-mile issue, research on metro-integrated ridesourcing usage is rather limited. This paper applies a gradient boosting decision tree (GBDT) method to investigate the nonlinear relationship between the built environment and metro-originated and metro-destinated usage, using ridesourcing trip record data. The results show that built environment factors (i.e., density, diversity, and destination accessibility) have significant nonlinear and threshold effects on the integrated usage, which differentiate between weekdays and weekends. Different patterns are also observed between metro-originated and metro-destinated usage. Employment density has a more significantly positive effect on weekday metro-originated usage than metro-destinated usage. The distance to metro stations does exist an effective range. These findings could help not only transportation network companies optimize ridesourcing services but also transportation planners formulate tailor-made land use interventions to facilitate intermodal mobility.
Language
English
Source (journal)
Transportation research: part D: transport and environment. - Oxford
Publication
Oxford : 2022
ISSN
1361-9209
DOI
10.1016/J.TRD.2022.103426
Volume/pages
110 (2022) , 16 p.
Article Reference
103426
ISI
000858839500005
Full text (Publisher's DOI)
UAntwerpen
Research group
Publication type
Subject
External links
Web of Science
Record
Identifier
Creation 02.04.2024
Last edited 03.04.2024
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