Publication
Title
Event centrality in social anxiety disorder and major depressive disorder
Author
Abstract
Event centrality is defined by the extent to which a memory of an event has become central to an individual’s identity and life story. Previous research predominantly focused on the link between event centrality and trauma-related symptomatology. Nevertheless, it can be argued that the perception of (adverse) events as central to one’s self is not exclusive to Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). Other disorders where adverse events are linked to the onset of symptoms might also be related to event centrality. This study examined the relevance of event centrality for Social Anxiety Disorder (SAD) and for Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) separately. Moreover, we examined which cognitive and emotion regulation variables (i.e., trait anxiety, rumination, worry, intrusions and avoidance, and posttraumatic cognitions) mediated these relationships. No significant correlation was found between event centrality and social anxiety. However, a significant positive correlation was found between event centrality and depression. In a combined group, this relation was mediated by all cognitive and emotion regulation variables except for worry.
Language
English
Source (journal)
Memory / Lancaster University. Department of Psychology. - Hove, 1993, currens
Publication
Hove : 2024
ISSN
0965-8211 [print]
1464-0686 [online]
DOI
10.1080/09658211.2024.2341706
Volume/pages
(2024) , p. 1-12
ISI
001208213400001
Pubmed ID
38662790
Full text (Publisher's DOI)
Full text (open access)
The author-created version that incorporates referee comments and is the accepted for publication version Available from 25.10.2024
Full text (publisher's version - intranet only)
UAntwerpen
Faculty/Department
Research group
Publication type
Subject
Affiliation
Publications with a UAntwerp address
External links
Record
Identifier
Creation 29.04.2024
Last edited 07.05.2024
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