Title
The processing of secretogranin II in the peripheral nervous system : release of secretoneurin from porcine sympathetic nerve terminals The processing of secretogranin II in the peripheral nervous system : release of secretoneurin from porcine sympathetic nerve terminals
Author
Faculty/Department
Faculty of Pharmaceutical, Biomedical and Veterinary Sciences. Veterinary Sciences
Faculty of Pharmaceutical, Biomedical and Veterinary Sciences. Pharmacy
Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences
Publication type
article
Publication
Amsterdam ,
Subject
Human medicine
Source (journal)
Brain research. - Amsterdam
Volume/pages
818(1999) :2 , p. 459-467
ISSN
0921-8246
0006-8993
0006-8993
ISI
000078560200030
Carrier
E
Target language
English (eng)
Full text (Publishers DOI)
Affiliation
University of Antwerp
Abstract
The distribution of secretoneurin (SN), a peptide derived from secretogranin II (SgII), in the coeliac ganglion, the splenic nerve and the spleen was examined by immunohistochemistry. In the ganglion, SN immunoreactivity (LR) was unevenly distributed. Positive nerve terminals densely surrounded some postganglionic perikarya in which also intense SN-IR was present. In the crushed splenic nerves, intense immunoreactivities appeared proximal (but to a less extent also distal) to the crush of the nerve. Analysis by cytofluorimetric scanning (CFS) demonstrated that SN-IR and neuropeptide Y immunoreactivity (NPY-IR) were predominant in the axons proximal to the crush representing anterogradely transported components. Using radioimmunoassay (RIA) we demonstrated that upon electrical stimulation (10 Hz, 1 min) of the splenic nerve, significant amounts of SN-IR (64.2 +/- 2.3 fmol) were released together with NA (4.1 x 10(6) +/- 0.2 fmol) and NPY (330.0 +/- 7.2 fmol) from the isolated perfused porcine spleen. To evaluate the processing of SgII in sympathetic neurons, boiled tissue extracts (coeliac ganglia and splenic nerve) and boiled spleen perfusate (used as a suitable source for vesicle derived peptides) were analysed by gel filtration chromatography followed by SN-RIA. In all cases immunoreactivity was present solely as SN, indicating that SgII was fully processed to the free peptide. The evidence that SN is transported to the nerve terminals and is released from the porcine spleen upon nerve stimulation, suggests that it may modulate adrenergic neurotransmission and may also play a role in the neuroimmune communication. (C) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.
E-info
http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000078560200030&DestLinkType=RelatedRecords&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=ef845e08c439e550330acc77c7d2d848
http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000078560200030&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=ef845e08c439e550330acc77c7d2d848
http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000078560200030&DestLinkType=CitingArticles&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=ef845e08c439e550330acc77c7d2d848
Handle