Title
Correlations between cognitive, behavioural and psychological findings and levels of vitamin <tex>$B_{12}$</tex> and folate in patients with dementia: a prospective study Correlations between cognitive, behavioural and psychological findings and levels of vitamin <tex>$B_{12}$</tex> and folate in patients with dementia: a prospective study
Author
Faculty/Department
Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences
Faculty of Pharmaceutical, Biomedical and Veterinary Sciences . Biomedical Sciences
Publication type
article
Publication
Chichester ,
Subject
Human medicine
Source (journal)
International journal of geriatric psychiatry
International journal of geriatric psychiatry: a journal of the psychiatry of late life and allied sciences. - Chichester
Volume/pages
19(2004) , p. 365-370
ISSN
0885-6230
ISI
000220700800009
Carrier
E
Target language
English (eng)
Full text (Publishers DOI)
Affiliation
University of Antwerp
Abstract
Background Associations between low levels of folate and vitamin B-12 and cognitive impairment inpatients with dementia have been reported. Some studies revealed correlations between low levels of vitamin B-12 and behavioural and psychological signs and symptoms of dementia (BPSD) in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. Given the lack of studies in frontotemporal dementia (FrD) and on folate and given the methodological shortcomings of former publications, we set up a prospective study. Methods At inclusion, AD (n = 152) and FTD (n = 28) patients underwent a neuropsychological examination. Behaviour was assessed using a battery of behavioural assessment scales. Determination of serum vitamin B-12 and red cell folate levels were performed within a time frame of two weeks of inclusion. Results In both patient groups, significantly negative correlations between levels of serum vitamin B-12 and red cell folate and the degree of cognitive deterioration were found. No correlations with BPSD were found in the AD patient group. In FTD patients, levels of vitamin B-12 were negatively correlated with both hallucinations (p = 0.022) and diurnal rhythm disturbances (p = 0.036). Conclusions The observed negative correlations between levels of vitamin B-12 and folate and cognitive impairment in both AD and FrD patients, raise the possibility of a non-specific etiological role. Although levels of vitamin B-12 and folate did not correlate with BPSD in AD patients, negative correlations between serum vitamin B-12 levels and BPSD in FrD patients were revealed. Decreased serum vitamin B-12 levels may predispose FTD patients to develop hallucinations and diurnal rhythm disturbances. Copyright (C) 2004 John Wiley Sons, Ltd.
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