Title
Virological and immunological analysis of a triple combination pilot study with loviride, lamivudine, and zidovudine (ZDV) in HIV-1 infected patientsVirological and immunological analysis of a triple combination pilot study with loviride, lamivudine, and zidovudine (ZDV) in HIV-1 infected patients
Author
Faculty/Department
Faculty of Pharmaceutical, Biomedical and Veterinary Sciences. Veterinary Sciences
Research group
Laboratory for Microbiology, Parasitology and Hygiene (LMPH)
Publication type
article
Publication
London,
Subject
Human medicine
Source (journal)
AIDS. - London
Volume/pages
10(1996):5, p. 1-7
ISSN
0269-9370
ISI
A1996UJ81700001
Carrier
E
Target language
English (eng)
Full text (Publishers DOI)
Affiliation
University of Antwerp
Abstract
Objective: To compare two antiretroviral regimens, loviride plus lamivudine (3TC) plus zidovudine (ZDV) (triple combination) and loviride plus ZDV (double combination) in terms of pharmacokinetic interactions, tolerability, safety, and immunological and virological efficacy. Study design: An open, case-controlled, pharmacokinetic and 24-week continuous treatment pilot study. Patients: Twenty p24 antigen-positive patients, 10 per treatment group, were matched according to p24 antigenaemia less or more than 100 pg, CD4 count less or more than 150x10(6)/1, and gender. Eight out of 10 cases and seven out of 10 Controls had received previous antiretroviral therapy. Results: No clinically relevant pharmacokinetic interactions were observed. Both treatment combinations were well tolerated. Median absolute and percentage CD4 count increases above baseline were more pronounced in the triple combination arm than in the double combination arm. Median p24-antigen and plasma viraemia level decreases below baseline were more pronounced in the triple combination arm. The M(184)I/V mutation was detected in all plasma samples of triple combination patients examined at week 12. Mutations conferring resistance to loviride and ZDV were found in a significant subset of patients in both treatment arms. Conclusions: Both combination regimens have an excellent safety/tolerability profile, but a higher level of in vivo efficacy is achieved by the triple combination, despite genotypic changes conferring resistance to one or all of these agents. The conclusions drawn are limited by small population size and the heterogenous pretreatment history. However, they support the validity of and strongly encourage a rationally designed multidrug combination approach to HIV therapy.
E-info
http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1996UJ81700001&DestLinkType=RelatedRecords&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=ef845e08c439e550330acc77c7d2d848
http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1996UJ81700001&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=ef845e08c439e550330acc77c7d2d848
http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1996UJ81700001&DestLinkType=CitingArticles&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=ef845e08c439e550330acc77c7d2d848
Handle