Title
Roux-en-Y gastric bypass as a re-do procedure for failed restricive gastric surgery Roux-en-Y gastric bypass as a re-do procedure for failed restricive gastric surgery
Author
Faculty/Department
Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences
Publication type
article
Publication
Source (journal)
Surgical endoscopy and other interventional techniques
Volume/pages
22(2008) :4 , p. 1014-1018
ISI
000254939900028
Carrier
E
Target language
English (eng)
Full text (Publishers DOI)
Affiliation
University of Antwerp
Abstract
Background Gastric restrictive procedures such as laparoscopic gastric banding or vertical banded gastroplasty show, at longer follow up, more and more failures and complications. This study focuses on the results of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass procedure (RYGBP) done as a re-do procedure, both after a technically failed restrictive procedure or when the restrictive procedure failed to obtain substantial weight loss. Methods We reviewed data concerning the postoperative complications and weight loss of 36 patients undergoing re-do surgery for failed restrictive procedures. Results Over a period of two years, 36 patients with a mean age of 40.9 years were converted to a RYGBP. Median time to conversion was 4.9 years, median follow up after conversion was 6.6 months. Early postoperative complications (less than 30 days postoperatively) were noted in 11 patients (30%). A greater number of early complications were noticed in group A (technical complications) compared to group B (insufficient weight loss) (39% vs. 22%). Late postoperative complications were seen in six patients (16%). In this relatively short follow up period we noticed a drop in body mass index (BMI) from a mean of 38.8kg/m2 to 30.9 kg/m2 with a mean excess body weight loss (EBWL) of 33.1% after the re-do procedure. Body mass index decreased from a mean preoperative value of 37.6kg/m2 to 28.9 kg/m2 in group A patients with an EBWL 36%, while group B patients had a change in BMI from 40.1kg/m2 to 32.9 kg/m2 with a mean EBWL of 30%. Conclusion Based on the literature, we can presume that restrictive surgery for morbidly obese patients will require many reoperations in the future. The standard operation of choice is RYGBP. In our study this procedure showed a higher, but not significantly early morbidity rate when the indication for re-do surgery was a technical complication of the initial procedure.
E-info
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