Publication
Title
Cell types involved in allergic asthma and their use in **in vitro** models to assess respiratory sensitization
Author
Abstract
This review first describes the mechanism and cell types involved in allergic asthma, which is a complex clinical disease characterized by airway obstruction, airway inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness to a variety of stimuli. The development of allergic asthma exists of three phases, namely the induction phase, the early-phase asthmatic reaction (EAR) and the late-phase asthmatic reaction (LAR). In the induction phase, antigen-presenting cells play a major role. Most important cells in the EAR are mast cells, and during the LAR, various cell types, such as eosinophils, neutrophils, T cells, macrophages, dendritic cells (DCs), and cells that endow structure are involved. In occupational asthma, this immunological mechanism is involved in 90% of the cases. The second part of this review gives an overview of in vitro models to assess the hazardous potential of high- and low-molecular weight chemicals on the respiratory system. In order to develop a good in vitro model for respiratory allergy, the choice of appropriate cell types is important. Epithelial cells, macrophages and DCs are currently the most used models in this field of research.
Language
English
Source (journal)
Toxicology in vitro. - Oxford
Publication
Oxford : 2008
ISSN
0887-2333
Volume/pages
22:6(2008), p. 1419-1431
ISI
000259547300001
Full text (Publishers DOI)
UAntwerpen
Faculty/Department
Research group
Publication type
Subject
Affiliation
Publications with a UAntwerp address
External links
Web of Science
Record
Identification
Creation 23.12.2008
Last edited 29.04.2017
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