Title
Crossed aphasia and visuo-spatial neglect following a right thalamic stroke: a case study and review of the literature Crossed aphasia and visuo-spatial neglect following a right thalamic stroke: a case study and review of the literature
Author
Faculty/Department
Faculty of Pharmaceutical, Biomedical and Veterinary Sciences . Biomedical Sciences
Publication type
article
Publication
London ,
Subject
Human medicine
Linguistics
Source (journal)
Behavioural neurology : an international journal with a predominantly clinical emphasis on the meaning of disordered human behaviour / Association of American Medical Colleges. - London
Volume/pages
19(2008) :4 , p. 177-194
ISSN
0953-4180
ISI
000262407000003
Carrier
E
Target language
English (eng)
Full text (Publishers DOI)
Affiliation
University of Antwerp
Abstract
Crossed aphasia in dextrals (CAD) following pure subcortical lesions is rare. This study describes a right-handed patient with an ischemic lesion in the right thalamus. In the post-acute phase of the stroke, a unique combination of 'crossed thalamic aphasia' was found with left visuo-spatial neglect and constructional apraxia. On the basis of the criteria used in Mariën et al. [67], this case-report is the first reliable representative of vascular CAD following an isolated lesion in the right thalamus. Furthermore, this paper presents a detailed analysis of linguistic and cognitive impairments of 'possible' and 'reliable' subcortical CAD-cases published since 1975. Out of 25 patients with a pure subcortical lesion, nine cases were considered as 'possibly reliable or reliable'. A review of these cases reveals that: 1) demographic data are consistent with the general findings for the entire group of vascular CAD, 2) the neurolinguistic findings do not support the data in the general CAD-population with regard to a) the high prevalence of transcortical aphasia and b) the tendency towards a copresence of an oral versus written language dissociation and a 'mirror-image' lesion-aphasia profile, 3) subcortical CAD is not a transient phenomenon, 4) the lesion-aphasia correlations are not congruent with the high incidence of anomalous cases in the general CAD-population, 5) neuropsychological impairments may accompany subcortical CAD.
E-info
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