Title
Rates of very preterm birth in Europe and neonatal mortality ratesRates of very preterm birth in Europe and neonatal mortality rates
Author
Faculty/Department
Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences
Research group
Laboratory Experimental Medicine and Pediatrics (LEMP)
Publication type
article
Publication
London,
Subject
Human medicine
Source (journal)
Archives of disease in childhood : fetal and neonatal edition. - London, 1988, currens
Volume/pages
94(2009):4, p. F253-F256
ISSN
1359-2998
1468-2052
ISI
000268164200007
Carrier
E
Target language
English (eng)
Full text (Publishers DOI)
Affiliation
University of Antwerp
Abstract
Objective: To estimate the influence of variation in the rate of very preterm delivery on the reported rate of neonatal death in ten European regions. Design: Comparison of 10 separate geographically defined European populations, from nine European countries, over a one year period (seven months in one region). Participants: All births that occurred between 22+0 and 31+6 weeks of gestation in 2003. Main outcome measure: Neonatal death rate adjusted for rate of delivery at this gestation. Results: Rate of delivery of all births at 22+0-31+6 weeks of gestation and live births only were calculated for each region. Two regions had significantly higher rates of very preterm delivery per 1000 births (Trent UK (16.8, 95% CI 15.7-17.9) and the Northern UK (17.1, 95% CI 15.6-18.6); group mean 13.2, 95% CI 12.9 to 13.5). Four regions had rates significantly below the group average: Portugal North (10.7, 95% CI 9.6 to 11.8), Eastern and Central Netherlands (10.6, 95% CI 9.7 to 11.6), Eastern Denmark (11.2, 95% CI 10.1 to 12.4) and Lazio in Italy (11.0, 95% CI 10.1 to 11.9). Similar trends were seen in live birth data. Published rates of neonatal death for each region were then adjusted by applying: a) a standardised rate of very preterm delivery and b) the existing death rate for babies born at this gestation in the individual region. This produced much greater homogeneity in terms of neonatal mortality. Conclusions: Variation in the rate of very preterm delivery has a major influence on reported neonatal death rates.
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