Title
Allogeneic stromal cell implantation in brain tissue leads to robust microglial activationAllogeneic stromal cell implantation in brain tissue leads to robust microglial activation
Author
Faculty/Department
Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences
Faculty of Pharmaceutical, Biomedical and Veterinary Sciences . Biomedical Sciences
Research group
Anatomopathologie
Antwerp Surgical Training, Anatomy and Research Centre (ASTARC)
Laboratorium voor Experimentele Hematologie
Vaccine & Infectious Disease Institute (VAXINFECTIO)
Laboratory Experimental Medicine and Pediatrics (LEMP)
Molecular Imaging, Pathology, Radiotherapy & Oncology (MIPRO)
Bio-Imaging lab
Plasma, laser ablation and surface modeling - Antwerp (PLASMANT)
Publication type
article
Publication
Adelaide,
Subject
Human medicine
Source (journal)
Immunology and cell biology. - Adelaide, 1987, currens
Volume/pages
87(2009), p. 267-273
ISSN
0818-9641
ISI
000266208800003
Carrier
E
Target language
English (eng)
Full text (Publishers DOI)
Affiliation
University of Antwerp
Abstract
Although adult and embryonic stem cell-based therapy for central nervous system (CNS) injury is being developed worldwide, less attention is given to the immunological aspects of allogeneic cell implantation in the CNS. The latter is of major importance because, from a practical point of view, future stem cell-based therapy for CNS injury will likely be performed using well-characterised allogeneic stem cell populations. In this study, we aimed to further describe the immunological mechanism leading to rejection of allogeneic bone marrow-derived stromal cells (BM-SC) after implantation in murine CNS. For this, we first investigated the impact of autologous and allogeneic BM-SC on microglia activation in vitro. Although the results indicate that both autologous and allogeneic BM-SC do not activate microglia themselves in vitro, they also do not inhibit activation of microglia after exogenous stimuli in vitro. Next, we investigated the impact of allogeneic BM-SC on microglia activation in vivo. In contrast to the in vitro observations, microglia become highly activated in vivo after implantation of allogeneic BM-SC in the CNS of immune-competent mice. Moreover, our results suggest that microglia, rather than T-cells, are the major contributors to allograft rejection in the CNS.
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