Title
Holocene comment and reply: the disappearance of **S. imbricatum** from European raised bogs: a comment on McClymont et al. Holocene comment and reply: the disappearance of **S. imbricatum** from European raised bogs: a comment on McClymont et al.
Author
Faculty/Department
Faculty of Sciences. Biology
Publication type
article
Publication
Sevenoaks ,
Subject
Biology
Source (journal)
The holocene. - Sevenoaks
Volume/pages
19(2009) :7 , p. 1093-1097
ISSN
0959-6836
ISI
000271041200010
Carrier
E
Target language
English (eng)
Full text (Publishers DOI)
Affiliation
University of Antwerp
Abstract
McClymont et al. (The Holocene 18 (2008) 9911002) present data on several environmental proxies to explore the disappearance of Sphagnum imbricatum from a peat bog in northern England, Wales and Ireland, respectively. McClymont et al. used their results to argue that a combination of rapid water-table rise and increased aeolian nutrient input from surrounding (agricultural) areas may have caused the disappearance of S. imbricatum from European raised bogs. The paper contributes to a growing body of literature focusing on the abrupt decline of S. imbricatum (S. austinii) AD 10001700. From the literature it becomes apparent that determining the exact mechanism for the decline of S. imbricatum (S. austinii) is difficult. Hence, many potential mechanisms have been suggested, amongst which increased wetness, increased interspecific competition, local burning and increased nutrient input are just a few examples. Although we do not comment on the quality of the science, there are a few things to be considered in order to get a complete picture.
McClymont et al. (The Holocene 18 (2008) 9911002) present data on several environmental proxies to explore the disappearance of Sphagnum imbricatum from a peat bog in northern England, Wales and Ireland, respectively. McClymont et al. used their results to argue that a combination of rapid water-table rise and increased aeolian nutrient input from surrounding (agricultural) areas may have caused the disappearance of S. imbricatum from European raised bogs. The paper contributes to a growing body of literature focusing on the abrupt decline of S. imbricatum (S. austinii) AD 10001700. From the literature it becomes apparent that determining the exact mechanism for the decline of S. imbricatum (S. austinii) is difficult. Hence, many potential mechanisms have been suggested, amongst which increased wetness, increased interspecific competition, local burning and increased nutrient input are just a few examples. Although we do not comment on the quality of the science, there are a few things to be considered in order to get a complete picture.
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