Title
Weight and blood pressure response to weight management and sibutramine in diabetic and non-diabetic high-risk patients: an analysis from the 6-week lead-in period of the sibutramine cardiovascular outcomes (SCOUT) trial Weight and blood pressure response to weight management and sibutramine in diabetic and non-diabetic high-risk patients: an analysis from the 6-week lead-in period of the sibutramine cardiovascular outcomes (SCOUT) trial
Author
Faculty/Department
Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences
Publication type
article
Publication
Oxford ,
Subject
Human medicine
Source (journal)
Diabetes obesity and metabolism. - Oxford
Volume/pages
12(2010) :1 , p. 26-34
ISSN
1462-8902
ISI
000273017200004
Carrier
E
Target language
English (eng)
Full text (Publishers DOI)
Affiliation
University of Antwerp
Abstract
Objective: To assess treatment responses to sibutramine and weight management in diabetic patients during the lead-in period of the Sibutramine Cardiovascular OUTcomes (SCOUT) trial. Methods: SCOUT is an ongoing, prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled outcome trial in cardiovascular high-risk overweight/obese patients. A total of 10 742 patients received single-blind sibutramine and individualized weight management during the 6-week lead-in period; 84% had a history of type 2 diabetes mellitus and additional co-morbidities. Post-hoc analyses assessed anthropomorphic and vital sign responses between patients with and without diabetes. Results: Concomitant antidiabetic medication use was reported by 86% of the diabetic patients (approximately 30% required insulinalone or in combination). Body weight and waist circumference decreased in diabetic patients: median 2.1 kg; 2.0 cm (both men and women); for those on insulin: 1.9 kg; 1.5/2.0 cm (men/women); without insulin: 2.3 kg; 2.0 cm (both men and women); blood pressure (BP) was also reduced (median systolic/diastolic 3.5/1.0 mmHg) with larger reductions in diabetic patients who were hypertensive and/or lost the most weight (>5%). In diabetic patients who entered with BP at target (<130/<85 mmHg) but did not lose weight (N = 245), increases of 3.5/2.0 mmHg were observed. Non-diabetic patients had greater weight losses (2.5 kg) but smaller reductions in BP (systolic/diastolic −2.5/−0.5 mmHg). Pulse rate increases were less in diabetic vs. non-diabetic patients (1.5 vs. 2.0 bpm). Conclusion: In these high-risk diabetic patients, sibutramine and lifestyle modifications for 6 weeks resulted in small, but clinically relevant, median reductions in body weight, waist circumference and BP. A small median increase in pulse rate was recorded.
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