Title
Identification of 2 loci at chromosomes 9 and 14 in a multiplex family with frontotemporal lobar degeneration and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis Identification of 2 loci at chromosomes 9 and 14 in a multiplex family with frontotemporal lobar degeneration and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis
Author
Faculty/Department
Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences
Faculty of Pharmaceutical, Biomedical and Veterinary Sciences . Biomedical Sciences
Publication type
article
Publication
Chicago, Ill. ,
Subject
Human medicine
Source (journal)
Archives of neurology / American Medical Association. - Chicago, Ill., 1960 - 2012
Volume/pages
65(2010) :5 , p. 606-616
ISSN
0003-9942
1538-3687
ISI
000277467000013
Carrier
E
Target language
English (eng)
Full text (Publishers DOI)
Affiliation
University of Antwerp
Abstract
Background Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) is a neurodegenerative brain disorder that can be accompanied by signs of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Objective To identify a novel gene for FTLD-ALS. Design Genome-wide linkage study in a multiplex family with FTLD-ALS with subsequent fine mapping and mutation analyses. Setting Memory Clinic of the Middelheim General Hospital. Patients An extended Belgian family with autosomal dominant FTLD-ALS, DR14, with a mean age at onset of 58.1 years (range, 51-65 years [n = 9]) and mean disease duration of 6.4 years (range, 1-17 years [n = 9]). The proband with clinical FTLD showed typical FTLD pathology with neuronal ubiquitin-immunoreactive inclusions that were positive for the transactivation response DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43). Main Outcome Measure Linkage to chromosome 9 and 14. Results We found significant linkage to chromosome 9p23-q21 (multipoint logarithm of odds [LOD] score = 3.38) overlapping with a known FTLD-ALS locus (ALSFTD2) and nearly significant linkage to a second locus at chromosome 14q31-q32 (multipoint LOD score = 2.79). Obligate meiotic recombinants defined candidate regions of 74.7 megabase pairs (Mb) at chromosome 9 and 14.6 Mb near the telomere of chromosome 14q. In both loci, the disease haplotype segregated in all patients in the family. Mutation analysis of selected genes and copy number variation analysis in both loci did not reveal segregating pathogenic mutations. Conclusions Family DR14 provides additional significant evidence for the importance of the chromosome 9 gene to FTLD-ALS and reveals a possible novel locus for FTLD-ALS at chromosome 14. The identification of the underlying genetic defect(s) will significantly contribute to the understanding of neurodegenerative disease mechanisms in FTLD, ALS, and associated neurodegenerative disorders.
E-info
https://repository.uantwerpen.be/docman/iruaauth/f62562/97305d8449d.pdf
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