Publication
Title
Recognition of cellular implants by the brain's innate immune system
Author
Abstract
Currently, much attention is given to the development of cellular therapies for treatment of central nervous system (CNS) injuries. Diverse cell implantation strategies, either to directly replace damaged neural tissue or to create a neuroregenerative environment, are proposed to restore impaired brain function. However, because of the complexity of the CNS, it is now becoming clear that the contribution of cell implantation into the brain will mainly act in a supportive manner. In addition, given the time dependence of neural development during embryonic and post-natal life, cellular implants, either self or non-self, will most likely have to interact for a sustained period of time with both healthy and injured neural tissue. The latter also implies potential recognition of cellular implants by the innate immune system of the brain. In this review, we will emphasize on preclinical observations in rodents, regarding the recognition and immunogenicity of autologous, allogeneic and xenogeneic cellular implants in the CNS of immune-competent hosts. Taken together, we here suggest that a profound study of the interaction between cellular grafts and the brain's innate immune system will be inevitable before clinical cell transplantation in the CNS can be performed successfully.
Language
English
Source (journal)
Immunology and cell biology. - Adelaide, 1987, currens
Publication
Adelaide : 2011
ISSN
0818-9641
Volume/pages
89:4(2011), p. 511-516
ISI
000290276800004
Full text (Publishers DOI)
UAntwerpen
Faculty/Department
Research group
Publication type
Subject
Affiliation
Publications with a UAntwerp address
External links
Web of Science
Record
Identification
Creation 27.01.2011
Last edited 25.05.2017
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