Title
Failure of <tex>$\gamma$</tex>-aminobutyrate acid-<tex>$\beta$</tex> agonist baclofen to improve balance, gait, and postural control after vestibular schwannoma resection Failure of <tex>$\gamma$</tex>-aminobutyrate acid-<tex>$\beta$</tex> agonist baclofen to improve balance, gait, and postural control after vestibular schwannoma resection
Author
Faculty/Department
Faculty of Sciences. Physics
Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences
Publication type
article
Publication
Philadelphia, Pa. ,
Subject
Human medicine
Source (journal)
Otology and neurotology. - Philadelphia, Pa.
Volume/pages
30(2009) :3 , p. 350-355
ISSN
1531-7129
ISI
000276925600014
Carrier
E
Target language
English (eng)
Full text (Publishers DOI)
Affiliation
University of Antwerp
Abstract
Introduction: Incomplete postural control often occurs after vestibular schwannoma (VS) surgery. Customized vestibular rehabilitation in man improves and speeds up this process. Animal experiments have shown an improved and faster vestibular compensation after administration of the γ-aminobutyrate acid (GABA)-β agonist baclofen. Objective: To examine whether medical treatment with baclofen provides an improvement of the compensation process after VS surgery. Design: A time-series study with historical control. Setting: Tertiary referral center. Methods: Thirteen patients who underwent VS resection were included and compared with a matched group of patients. In addition to an individualized vestibular rehabilitation protocol, the study group received medical treatment with 30 mg baclofen (a GABA-β agonist) daily during the first 6 weeks after surgery. Main Outcome Measures: Clinical gait and balance tests (Romberg maneuver, standing on foam, tandem Romberg, single-leg stance, Timed Up & Go test, tandem gait, Dynamic Gait Index) and Dizziness Handicap Inventory. Follow-up until 24 weeks after surgery. Results: When examining the postoperative test results, the group treated with baclofen did not perform better when compared with the matched (historical control) group. Repeated-measures analysis of variance revealed no significant group effect, but a significant time effect for almost all balance tests during the acute recovery period was found. An interaction effect between time and intervention was seen concerning single-leg stance and Dizziness Handicap Inventory scores for the acute recovery period. Conclusion: Medical therapy with baclofen did not seem to be beneficial in the process of central vestibular compensation.
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