Title
Sediment contact test with **Potamopyrgus antipodarum** in effect-directed analyses : challenges and opportunities Sediment contact test with **Potamopyrgus antipodarum** in effect-directed analyses : challenges and opportunities
Author
Faculty/Department
Faculty of Sciences. Biology
Publication type
article
Publication
Landsberg ,
Subject
Biology
Source (journal)
ESPR Environment science and pollution research international. - Landsberg
Volume/pages
18(2011) :8 , p. 1398-1404
ISSN
0944-1344
ISI
000293899700017
Carrier
E
Target language
English (eng)
Full text (Publishers DOI)
Affiliation
University of Antwerp
Abstract
Background and scope Effect-directed analysis is increasingly used for the identification of key toxicants in environmental samples and there is a growing need for in vivo biotests as diagnostic tools. Within this study, we performed an in vivo sediment contact test, applicable on both native field samples and their extracts or fractions, in order to be able to compare the results from both field and laboratory studies. Material and methods A sediment contact test with the prosobranch snail, Potamopyrgus antipodarum, was carried out on extracts and fractions of field sediments from three European river basins. The results were compared with previous results of the native field samples. Results In contrast to the native sediments, the extracts of the samples led to an overall decrease in reproduction. Even the chosen reference sites had an adverse effect on the snails' reproduction. It appeared that a higher bioavailability in the organic extracts, together with a changing composition of compounds could have lead to this change in effects. The fractionation of the extracts partly led to a more differentiated picture, but the resolution was not high enough to see any distinct effects on the snails' reproduction. Discussion and conclusion Our results highlight the importance of the use of in vivo biotests and point out the relevance of bioavailability in native sediments. For further fractionation studies, a more realistic extraction procedure, together with a higher resolution fractionation, would be appropriate in order to separate individual bioavailable compounds more efficient.
E-info
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