Publication
Title
The relationship of **Plasmodium falciparum** humeral immunity with HIV-1 immunosuppression and treatment efficacy in Zambia
Author
Abstract
Background HIV-1 infection affects malaria humeral immunity during pregnancy, but data for non-pregnant adults are lacking. This study reports the impact of HIV-1 infection and other variables on the level of malaria humeral immunity in adults with clinical malaria and whether humeral immune suppression was a risk factor for treatment failure. Methods Sera of 224 HIV-1 infected and 115 uninfected adults were compared for IgG to merozoite antigens AMA-1 and MSP2 (3D7 and FC27 types) determined by ELISA, and for IgG to the Variant Surface Antigens (VSA) of three different parasite line E8B, A4 and HCD6 determined by flow cytometry. Results Compared to HIV-1 uninfected adults, AMA-1 IgG was lower in HIV-1 infected (P = 0.02) and associated with low CD4 count AMA-1 IgG (P = 0.003). Low IgG to all three merozoite antigens was associated with less anemia (P = 0.03). High parasite load was associated with low MSP2 IgG 3D7 and FC27 types (P = 0.02 and P = 0.08). Antibody levels to VSA did not differ between HIV-1 infected and uninfected adults. However, low VSA IgGs were associated with high parasite load (P ≤ 0.002 for each parasite line) and with treatment failure (P ≤ 0.04 for each parasite line). Conclusion HIV-1 affects humeral responses to AMA-1, but seems to marginally or not affect humeral responses to other merozoite antigens and VSAs. The latter were important for controlling parasite density and predict treatment outcome.
Language
English
Source (journal)
Malaria journal. - London
Publication
London : 2009
ISSN
1475-2875
Volume/pages
8(2009), p. 258,1-258,9
ISI
000272255800001
Full text (Publisher's DOI)
Full text (open access)
UAntwerpen
Faculty/Department
Research group
Publication type
Subject
Affiliation
Publications with a UAntwerp address
External links
Web of Science
Record
Identification
Creation 19.05.2011
Last edited 06.08.2017
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