Publication
Title
Strontium
Author
Abstract
Strontium (Sr) is one of the alkaline earth metals, with properties resembling calcium (Ca). Strontium is not classified as essential for human or other organisms, and environmental Sr is considered hazardous to organisms because of radiological hazards associated with its radionuclides. In this review, physiological and toxicological information about stable and radioactive Sr relevant to freshwater and marine fish has been summarized. After a brief description of chemistry, bioaccumulation, and toxic effects, mechanisms related to uptake, internal handling, and elimination of Sr in fish are reviewed. A comprehensive survey of old and recent literature makes it clear that Sr preferentially accumulates in the bony parts (skeleton, scales, otoliths) of fish, and its accumulation largely depends on environmental factors. Much less is known about the physiological and toxicological mechanisms of Sr in fish. Where mechanistic information on fish for an area is absent, comments on the pertinent area have been made, based on mammalian studies or those focused on Ca physiology in fish. Finally, several recommendations have been included, identifying specific areas that warrant further research.
Language
English
Source (book)
Homeostasis and toxicology of non-essential metals / Wood, Chris M. [edit.]
Publication
Amsterdam : Elsevier, 2011
ISBN
978-0-12-378634-0
Volume/pages
p. 351-390
UAntwerpen
Faculty/Department
Research group
Publication type
Subject
Affiliation
Publications with a UAntwerp address
External links
Record
Identification
Creation 26.08.2011
Last edited 11.09.2014
To cite this reference