Title
Dominant glint based prey localization in horseshoe bats : a possible strategy for noise rejection Dominant glint based prey localization in horseshoe bats : a possible strategy for noise rejection
Author
Faculty/Department
Faculty of Applied Economics
Faculty of Sciences. Biology
Publication type
article
Publication
San Francisco, Calif.
Subject
Mathematics
Physics
Chemistry
Biology
Computer. Automation
Source (journal)
PLoS computational biology. - San Francisco, Calif.
Volume/pages
7(2011) :12 , p. e1002268,1-e1002268,11
ISSN
1553-734X
Article Reference
e1002268
Carrier
E-only publicatie
Target language
English (eng)
Full text (Publishers DOI)
Affiliation
University of Antwerp
Abstract
Rhinolophidae or Horseshoe bats emit long and narrowband calls. Fluttering insect prey generates echoes in which amplitude and frequency shifts are present, i.e. glints. These glints are reliable cues about the presence of prey and also encode certain properties of the prey. In this paper, we propose that these glints, i.e. the dominant glints, are also reliable signals upon which to base prey localization. In contrast to the spectral cues used by many other bats, the localization cues in Rhinolophidae are most likely provided by self-induced amplitude modulations generated by pinnae movement. Amplitude variations in the echo not introduced by the moving pinnae can be considered as noise interfering with the localization process. The amplitude of the dominant glints is very stable. Therefore, these parts of the echoes contain very little noise. However, using only the dominant glints potentially comes at a cost. Depending on the flutter rate of the insect, a limited number of dominant glints will be present in each echo giving the bat a limited number of sample points on which to base localization. We evaluate the feasibility of a strategy under which Rhinolophidae use only dominant glints. We use a computational model of the echolocation task faced by Rhinolophidae. Our model includes the spatial filtering of the echoes by the morphology of the sonar apparatus of Rhinolophus rouxii as well as the amplitude modulations introduced by pinnae movements. Using this model, we evaluate whether the dominant glints provide Rhinolophidae with enough information to perform localization. Our simulations show that Rhinolophidae can use dominant glints in the echoes as carriers for self-induced amplitude modulations serving as localization cues. In particular, it is shown that the reduction in noise achieved by using only the dominant glints outweighs the information loss that occurs by sampling the echo.
Full text (open access)
https://repository.uantwerpen.be/docman/irua/711767/59b7e675.pdf
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