Publication
Title
A comparative study of the variety and complexity of object manipulation in captive chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) and Bonobos (Pan paniscus)
Author
Abstract
Four types of specific objects: wooden spoons, metal bowls, plastic boxes, and cotton towels were introduced in a similar setting to two captive groups of different species in the genus Pan, the bonobo and the chimpanzee. In total, 582 unique manipulation forms were distinguished by a set of variables: types of objects, motor patterns, body-parts used, the number of objects manipulated, and types of orienting manipulation. In sum, chimpanzees and bonobos were not so different in the variety and the complexity of object manipulation forms. However, comparison of the two species revealed significant differences as follows: (1) chimpanzees preferred to use only one hand during manipulation of both single- and multiple-objects, whereas in the case of multiple-objects bonobos used both hands significantly more often; (2) chimpanzees performed more orienting manipulations in single-object manipulations than did bonobos, whereas the reverse was the case in multiple-object manipulations; and (3) chimpanzees' object manipulations were overall more substrate-oriented than were bonobos'. The factors producing these differences are discussed in relation to positional behaviors and habitual tool use in the two species.
Language
English
Source (journal)
Primates. - Philadelphia, Pa
Publication
Philadelphia, Pa : 1996
ISSN
0032-8332
Volume/pages
37:4(1996), p. 423-441
ISI
A1996VP59100007
Full text (Publisher's DOI)
UAntwerpen
Faculty/Department
Research group
Publication type
Subject
Affiliation
Publications with a UAntwerp address
External links
Web of Science
Record
Identification
Creation 29.02.2012
Last edited 07.08.2017
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