Title
Effects of the long-term administration of nebivolol on the clinical symptoms, exercise capacity, and left ventricular function of patients with diastolic dysfunction : results of the ELANDD study Effects of the long-term administration of nebivolol on the clinical symptoms, exercise capacity, and left ventricular function of patients with diastolic dysfunction : results of the ELANDD study
Author
Faculty/Department
Faculty of Pharmaceutical, Biomedical and Veterinary Sciences. Pharmacy
Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences
Publication type
article
Publication
,
Subject
Human medicine
Source (journal)
European journal of heart failure. - Place of publication unknown
Volume/pages
14(2012) :2 , p. 219-225
ISSN
1388-9842
1879-0844
ISI
000299350800016
Carrier
E
Target language
English (eng)
Full text (Publishers DOI)
Affiliation
University of Antwerp
Abstract
Aims We hypothesized that nebivolol, a beta-blocker with nitric oxide-releasing properties, could favourably affect exercise capacity in patients with heart failure and preserved left ventricular ejection fraction (HFPEF). Methods and results A total of 116 subjects with HFPEF, in New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class II-III, with left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) >45%, and with echo-Doppler signs of LV diastolic dysfunction, were randomized to 6 months treatment with nebivolol or placebo, following a double-blind, parallel group design. The primary endpoint of the study was the change in 6 min walk test distance (6MWTD) after 6 months. Nebivolol did not improve 6MWTD (from 420 +/- 143 to 428 +/- 141 m with nebivolol vs. from 412 +/- 123 to 446 +/- 119 m with placebo, P = 0.004 for interaction) compared with placebo, and the peak oxygen uptake also remained unchanged (peakVO(2); from 17.02 +/- 4.79 to 16.32 +/- 3.76 mL/kg/min with nebivolol vs. from 17.79 +/- 5.96 to 18.59 +/- 5.64 mL/kg/min with placebo, P = 0.63 for interaction). Resting and peak blood pressure and heart rate decreased with nebivolol. A significant correlation was found between the change in peak exercise heart rate and that in peakVO(2) (r = 0.391; P = 0.003) for the nebivolol group. Quality of life, assessed using the Minnesota Living with Heart Failure (TM) Questionnaire, and NYHA classification improved to a similar extent in both groups, whereas N-terminal pro brain natriuretic peptide (NT-pro BNP) plasma levels remained unchanged. Conclusions Compared with placebo, 6 months treatment with nebivolol did not improve exercise capacity in patients with HFPEF. Its negative chronotropic effect may have contributed to this result.
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