Title
Cell type-associated differences in migration, survival and immunogenicity following grafting in CNS tissue Cell type-associated differences in migration, survival and immunogenicity following grafting in CNS tissue
Author
Faculty/Department
Faculty of Pharmaceutical, Biomedical and Veterinary Sciences. Veterinary Sciences
Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences
Faculty of Pharmaceutical, Biomedical and Veterinary Sciences . Biomedical Sciences
Publication type
article
Publication
Amsterdam ,
Subject
Biology
Human medicine
Source (journal)
Cell transplantation. - Amsterdam
Volume/pages
21(2012) :9 , p. 1867-1881
ISSN
0963-6897
ISI
000312431600005
Carrier
E
Target language
English (eng)
Full text (Publishers DOI)
Affiliation
University of Antwerp
Abstract
Cell transplantation has been suggested to display several neuro-protective and/or - regenerative effects in animal models of central nervous system (CNS) trauma. However, while most studies report on clinical observations, currently little is known regarding the actual fate of the cell populations grafted and whether or how the brain's innate immune system, mainly directed by activated microglia and astrocytes, interacts with autologous cellular implants. In this study, we grafted well-characterised neural stem cell, mouse embryonic fibroblast, dendritic cell, bone marrow mononuclear cell and splenocyte populations, all isolated or cultured from C57BL/6-eGFP transgenic mice, below the capsula externa (CE) of healthy C57BL/6 mice and below the inflamed/demyelinated CE of cuprizone-treated C57BL/6 mice. Two weeks post-grafting, an extensive quantitative multicolour histological analysis was performed in order: (i) to quantify cell graft localisation, migration, survival and toxicity, and (ii) to characterize endogenous CNS immune responses against the different cell grafts. Obtained results indicate dependent on the cell type grafted: (i) a different degree of cell graft migration, survival and toxicity, and (ii) a different organisation of the endogenous immune response. Based on these observations, we warrant that further research should be undertaken to understand - and eventually control - cell graft induced tissue damage and activation of the brain's innate immune system. The latter will be inevitable before cell grafting in the CNS can be performed safely and successfully in clinical settings.
E-info
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