Title
Randomized controlled trial of truncal exercises early after stroke to improve balance and mobility Randomized controlled trial of truncal exercises early after stroke to improve balance and mobility
Author
Faculty/Department
Faculty of Sciences. Physics
Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences
Publication type
article
Publication
New York, N.Y. ,
Subject
Human medicine
Source (journal)
Neurorehabilitation and neural repair. - New York, N.Y.
Volume/pages
26(2012) :3 , p. 231-238
ISSN
1545-9683
1552-6844
ISI
000300435300003
Carrier
E
Target language
English (eng)
Full text (Publishers DOI)
Affiliation
University of Antwerp
Abstract
Background. Sitting balance and the ability to perform selective truncal movements are important predictors of functional outcome after stroke. However, few clinical trials have evaluated the effect of truncal exercises. Objective. The authors assessed the effect of additional truncal exercises on truncal function, standing balance, and mobility. Methods. An assessor-blinded randomized controlled trial was carried out at a stroke rehabilitation hospital. A total of 33 participants (mean 35 days post onset) were randomly assigned to an experimental group (n = 18) or a control group (n = 15). In addition to conventional therapy, the experimental group received 16 hours of truncal exercises. The control group received 16 hours of sham treatment. Truncal function was evaluated by the Trunk Impairment Scale (TIS) and standing balance and mobility by the Tinetti Test. The Romberg with eyes open and eyes closed, Four Test Balance Scale (FTBS), Berg Balance Scale (BBS), Rivermead Motor Assessment Battery (RMAB), Functional Ambulation Categories, and Dynamic Gait Index (DGI) were performed to elucidate the findings of the primary outcome measures. Results. A treatment effect was found for the experimental group on the TIS (P < .001), Tinetti Test (P < .001), FTBS (P = .014), BBS (P = .007), RMAB (P < .001), and DGI (P = .006). Conclusions. In addition to conventional therapy, truncal exercises have a beneficial effect on truncal function, standing balance, and mobility in people after stroke.
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