Title
Active specific immunotherapy targeting the Wilms' tumor protein 1 (WT1) for patients with hematological malignancies and solid tumors : lessons from early clinical trials Active specific immunotherapy targeting the Wilms' tumor protein 1 (WT1) for patients with hematological malignancies and solid tumors : lessons from early clinical trials
Author
Faculty/Department
Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences
Publication type
article
Publication
,
Subject
Human medicine
Source (journal)
The oncologist. - Place of publication unknown
Volume/pages
17(2012) :2 , p. 250-259
ISSN
1083-7159
ISI
000300730200017
Carrier
E
Target language
English (eng)
Full text (Publishers DOI)
Affiliation
University of Antwerp
Abstract
There is a growing body of evidence that Wilms' tumor protein 1 (WT1) is a promising tumor antigen for the development of a novel class of universal cancer vaccines. Recently, in a National Cancer Institute prioritization project, WT1 was ranked first in a list of 75 cancer antigens. In this light, we exhaustively reviewed all published cancer vaccine trials reporting on WT1-targeted active specific immunotherapy in patients with hematological malignancies and solid tumors. In all clinical trials, vaccine-induced immunological responses could be detected. Importantly, objective clinical responses (including stable disease) were observed in 46% and 64% of evaluable vaccinated patients with solid tumors and hematological malignancies, respectively. Immunogenicity of WT1-based cancer vaccines was demonstrated by the detection of a specific immunological response in 35% and 68% of evaluable patients with solid tumors and hematological malignancies, respectively. In order to become part of the armamentarium of the modern oncologist, it will be important to design WT1-based immunotherapies applicable to a large patient population, to standardize vaccination protocols enabling systematic review, and to further optimize the immunostimulatory capacity of the vaccine components. Moreover, improved immunomonitoring tools that reveal clinically relevant T-cell responses will further shape the ideal WT1 immunotherapy strategy. In conclusion, the clinical results obtained so far in WT1-targeted cancer vaccine trials reveal an untapped potential for inducing cancer immunity with minimal side effects and hold promise for a new adjuvant treatment against residual disease and against cancer relapse. The Oncologist 2012;17:250-259
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