Publication
Title
From sin to insanity? Suicide trials in the Spanish Netherlands, sixteenth and seventeenth centuries
Author
Abstract
This article focuses on the relationship between suicide as an act inspired by the devil and suicide as an act of insanity in the sixteenth- and seventeenth-century Spanish Netherlands. It has become widely accepted that from the end of the seventeenth century on suicide became decriminalized, secularized, and medicalized, i.e., the devil disappeared from explanations for suicide and was replaced by madness, and so harsh penalties vanished. This article seeks to contribute to the complication of these notions. If one turns away from the eighteenth century as the age of change and instead focuses on the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, a broad view of coexisting and overlapping discourses about self-killings existed at an early date. By exploring the languages of demonic temptation and that of madness as judicial and discursive strategies, it is argued that both discourses competed with one another in the legal deciphering of suicide and thereby subverted any linear notion of secularization.
Language
English
Source (journal)
The sixteenth century journal. - Saint Louis, Mo, 1972, currens
Publication
Saint Louis, Mo : 2011
ISSN
0361-0160 [print]
2326-0726 [online]
Volume/pages
42:4(2011), p. 981-1002
ISI
000300750100002
UAntwerpen
Faculty/Department
Research group
Publication type
Subject
Affiliation
Publications with a UAntwerp address
External links
Web of Science
Record
Identification
Creation 18.04.2012
Last edited 16.09.2017
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