Publication
Title
Positron emission tomography in the management of nonsmall cell lung cancer
Author
Abstract
Positron emission tomography (PET) originally was a research tool for brain function and cardiac metabolism studies. In the past decade, metabolic imaging with PET has become an important new technique in the management of cancer patients. Although the structure-based imaging modalities like CT and MRI allow exquisite anatomic detail, their ability to correctly characterize tissues is limited by the fact that structural information alone does not always allow differentiation between malignant and benign lesions. Because PET relies on the detection of metabolic alterations observed in cancer cells, this examination yields data other than the associated structural characteristics. PET, therefore, allows the detection or monitoring of specific metabolic alterations that are not always associated with (or even precede) the anatomic changes. Lung cancer is likely the malignant tumor most extensively studied with PET. Most experience is gained in the characterization of indeterminate lung nodules and in staging of nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC).
Language
English
Source (journal)
Hematology and oncology clinics of North America. - Philadelphia, Pa, 1987, currens
Publication
Philadelphia, Pa : 2004
ISSN
0889-8588
1558-1977 [online]
Volume/pages
18:1(2004), p. 269-288
ISI
000189165400019
Full text (Publishers DOI)
Full text (publishers version - intranet only)
UAntwerpen
Faculty/Department
Publication type
Subject
External links
Web of Science
Record
Identification
Creation 18.06.2012
Last edited 11.05.2017