Title
Positron emission tomography with FDG in the detection of peritoneal and retroperitoneal metastases of ovarian cancer Positron emission tomography with FDG in the detection of peritoneal and retroperitoneal metastases of ovarian cancer
Author
Faculty/Department
Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences
Publication type
article
Publication
Basel ,
Subject
Human medicine
Source (journal)
Gynecologic and obstetric investigation. - Basel
Volume/pages
55(2003) :3 , p. 130-134
ISSN
0378-7346
ISI
000184342300002
Carrier
E
Target language
English (eng)
Full text (Publishers DOI)
Abstract
Objective: The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate 18F-FDG-PET, in comparison with CT, for the detection of peritoneal and retroperitoneal metastases of ovarian cancer. Methodology: 13 patients with primary (n = 7) or recurrent (n = 6) ovarian cancer underwent an attenuation-corrected 18F-FDG-PET of the abdomen as well as a contrast-enhanced abdominal CT, followed by surgical staging. For data analysis, the abdomen was artificially divided into six regions (right and left subphrenic region, right and left paracolic gutter, retroperitoneum and central abdomen). All images were reviewed and each region was visually scored on 18F-FDG-PET as well as on CT. 18F-FDG-PET results were compared with those of CT, using the surgical data as gold standard. Results: 73 regions were evaluable surgically and or histologically. Sensitivity was slightly better for CT than for 18F-FDG-PET (74 vs. 66%). Metastases of <5 mm were missed with both techniques. Specificity, however, was clearly better for 18F-FDG-PET than for CT (94 vs. 77%), especially in patients with recurrent disease, where postoperative changes (hematomas, adhesions, etc.) caused more false positive results on CT. Retroperitoneal lymph node involvement was found in 3/13 patients. The result of 18F-FDG-PET for the retroperitoneal lymph nodes was correct in all cases, whereas CT was false positive in 2 patients. 18F-FDG-PET is relatively inaccurate for the right and the left subphrenic region (missing tumor involvement in 5 patients compared to 2 patients for CT). Conclusion: Given the low sensitivity of both 18F-FDG-PET and CT for the detection of peritoneal metastases, surgical staging remains the gold standard. Because of the better specificity, 18F-FDG-PET might be preferred for evaluating residual or recurrent disease after surgery. 18F-FDG-PET was more sensitive in the retroperitoneal region than intraperitoneal.
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