Title
Methods to estimate the size and shape of the unaccommodated crystalline lens in vivoMethods to estimate the size and shape of the unaccommodated crystalline lens in vivo
Author
Faculty/Department
Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences
Research group
Translational Neurosciences (TNW)
Faculteit Geneeskunde
Publication type
article
Publication
St. Louis, Mo.,
Subject
Human medicine
Source (journal)
Investigative ophthalmology and visual science. - St. Louis, Mo.
Volume/pages
53(2012):6, p. 2533-2540
ISSN
0146-0404
ISI
000304864600002
Carrier
E
Target language
English (eng)
Full text (Publishers DOI)
Affiliation
University of Antwerp
Abstract
PURPOSE. The purpose of this article was to present methods capable of estimating the size and shape of the human eye lens without resorting to phakometry or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). METHODS. Previously published biometry and phakometry data of 66 emmetropic eyes of 66 subjects (age range [18, 63] years, spherical equivalent range [-0.75, +0.75] D) were used to define multiple linear regressions for the radii of curvature and thickness of the lens, from which the lens refractive index could be derived. MRI biometry was also available for a subset of 30 subjects, from which regressions could be determined for the vertex radii of curvature, conic constants, equatorial diameter, volume, and surface area. All regressions were compared with the phakometry and MRI data; the radii of curvature regressions were also compared with a method proposed by Bennett and Royston et al. RESULTS. The regressions were in good agreement with the original measurements. This was especially the case for the regressions of lens thickness, volume, and surface area, which each had an R-2 > 0.6. The regression for the posterior radius of curvature had an R-2 < 0.2, making this regression unreliable. For all other regressions we found 0.25 < R-2 < 0.6. The Bennett-Royston method also produced a good estimation of the radii of curvature, provided its parameters were adjusted appropriately. CONCLUSIONS. The regressions presented in this article offer a valuable alternative in case no measured lens biometry values are available; however care must be taken for possible outliers. (Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2012;53:2533-2540) DOI:10.1167/iovs.11-8645
E-info
https://repository.uantwerpen.be/docman/iruaauth/2c0127/0592123.pdf
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