Publication
Title
Hantavirus infection in Belgium
Author
Abstract
Hantavirus disease is a recently recognized anthropozoonosis with Hantavirus, a cosmopolite hemorrhagic fever virus of the Bunyaviridae family, as etiologic agent and wild rodents (or laboratory rats) as vector. Involved rodents remain apparently healthy, but excrete for most of their life infectious virus in urine, feces and saliva, which can be transmitted to man via aerosolization. Man is the only known endpoint of infection, with the kidney as main target organ (acute renal failure), but systemic illness with multi-organ impairment can also occur. At least 8 distinct Hantavirus serotypes have been isolated so far, 5 of which have a recognized clinical significance. Each serotype has his specific main rodent reservoir and geographical distribution. For Europe, the red bank vole (Clethrionomys glareolus) is the main rodent vector, carrying the Puumala (PUU) serotype, the etiologic agent of a viral condition known as Nephropathia epidemica (NE). Belgium witnessed its most important outbreak so far (more than 60 human cases) of PUU-induced NE in 1993 in the Southern part of the region between Sambre and Meuse, with Chimay as the principal focus. A very dense local population of bank voles was noted, probably related to some recent ecological disturbances. Data of successive rodent captures in the epidemic area of Chimay are briefly summarized. NE should be recognized as a novel zoonosis by veterinarians, forest keepers and other professional groups involved with rodents.
Language
French
Source (journal)
Annales de médecine vétérinaire. - Liège
Publication
Liège : 1994
ISSN
0003-4118
Volume/pages
138:4(1994), p. 257-262
ISI
A1994PH72100008
UAntwerpen
Faculty/Department
Research group
Publication type
Subject
Affiliation
Publications with a UAntwerp address
External links
Web of Science
Record
Identification
Creation 19.07.2012
Last edited 25.04.2017
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