Publication
Title
Genomic transmission clusters and circulating lineages of Mycobacterium tuberculosis among refugees residing in refugee camps in Ethiopia
Author
Abstract
Background: Understanding the transmission dynamics of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) could benefit the design of tuberculosis (TB) prevention and control strategies for refugee populations. Whole Genome Sequencing (WGS) has not yet been used to document the Mtb transmission dynamics among refugees in Ethiopia. We applied WGS to accurately identify transmission clusters and Mtb lineages among TB cases in refugee camps in Ethiopia. Method and design: We conducted a cross-sectional study of 610 refugees in refugee camps in Ethiopia presenting with symptoms of TB. WGS data of 67 isolates was analyzed using the Maximum Accessible Genome for Mtb Analysis (MAGMA) pipeline; iTol and FigTree were used to visualize phylogenetic trees, lineages, and the presence of transmission clusters. Results: Mtb culture-positive refugees originated from South Sudan (52/67, 77.6%), Somalia (9/67, 13.4%). Eritrea (4/67, 6%), and Sudan (2/67, 3%). The majority (52, 77.6%) of the isolates belonged to Mtb lineage (L) 3, and one L9 was identified from a Somalian refugee. The vast majority (82%) of the isolates were pan-susceptible Mtb, and none were multi-drug-resistant (MDR)-TB. Based on the 5-single nucleotide polymorphisms cutoff, we identified eight potential transmission clusters containing 23.9% of the isolates. Contact investigation confirmed epidemiological links with either family or social interaction within the refugee camps or with neighboring refugee camps. Conclusion: Four lineages (L1, L3, L4, and L9) were identified, with the majority of strains being L3, reflecting the Mtb L3 dominance in South Sudan, where the majority of refugees originated from. Recent transmission among refugees was relatively low (24%), likely due to the short study period. The improved understanding of the Mtb transmission dynamics using WGS in refugee camps could assist in designing effective TB control programs for refugees.
Language
English
Source (journal)
Infection, genetics and evolution. - Amsterdam
Publication
Amsterdam : 2023
ISSN
1567-1348
DOI
10.1016/J.MEEGID.2023.105530
Volume/pages
116 (2023) , p. 1-7
Article Reference
105530
ISI
001128132900001
Pubmed ID
38008242
Full text (Publisher's DOI)
Full text (open access)
UAntwerpen
Faculty/Department
Research group
Project info
Improved infectious diseases research and surveillance in Ethiopia through capacity building in bioinformatics and sequencing.
Publication type
Subject
Affiliation
Publications with a UAntwerp address
External links
Web of Science
Record
Identifier
Creation 09.01.2024
Last edited 12.01.2024
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